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Pojo's Pokémon Card of the Day

 

 Cedric Juniper  

- Legendary Treasures

Date Reviewed:
December 12, 2013

Ratings & Reviews Summary

Modified: 1.00
Limited: 4.40

Ratings are based on a 1 to 5 scale.
1 being the worst. 
3 ... average.  
5 is the highest rating.

Back to the main COTD Page

Combos With: See Below

Baby Mario
2010 UK National
Seniors
Champion

Cedric Juniper 

This card is a throwback to the old Blaine’s Quiz cards from the Gym Heroes era of the game. This type of card works by testing your opponent’s (fairly obscure) Pokémon knowledge: if they get it right something nice happens for them, if they get it wrong, then you reap the benefits. 

In the case of Cedric Juniper, you put a Pokémon face down and ask your opponent to guess the height. Right here, we can see a restriction on the card’s use that hurts it quite a bit: you need a Pokémon in hand to use it, and what’s more it needs to be one with the height printed on it (so you can’t use an EX). If your opponent guesses correctly, they get to draw three cards, which is nice for them, but if they don’t then what is your reward? Yep, you get to draw three. That’s the same effect as if you had played Cheren, only to do it you have to meet certain conditions, give out information about your hand, and risk helping out your opponent. Why would you even want to do that? Just why? It’s not even as if many people use Cheren itself. 

It’s not even feasible to play Cedric Juniper in a deck-out style deck to force your opponent to draw: they’ll just guess wrong deliberately if they need to. The only positive to this card that I can think of is that it is so bad that you won’t have to waste time reading the Pokedex to learn the height of everything.  

When it comes to drawing cards, Cedric has a lot to learn from is daughter. 

Rating 

Modified: 1 (worthless gimmick card)

Limited: 4 (draw is so precious here that even a terrible card like this is worth using)


Otaku

Today we look at Cedric Juniper.  Supporters typically “drive” a deck; they won’t win you the game (barring rare exceptions), but they are what usually help you set-up and maintain your resources.  As such, Cedric Juniper faces an almost paradoxical situation; players are hungry for new Supporters, but part of that is because Professor Juniper and N have set the bar so high that other Supporters, even those better than earlier, successful counterparts, have a hard time measuring up.

 

Cedric Juniper has you select a Pokémon from your hand, place it facedown in front of you (so not entering any particular zones), and have your opponent attempt to guess the height printed on said Pokémon’s card.  If they get it right, they draw three cards.  If they get it wrong, you draw three cards.  In either case, you return the selected Pokémon to your hand after revealing it to confirm if the guess was correct or not, and you cannot select a Pokémon card that doesn’t have its height printed on it.

 

This card taking this long to review was a bad sign that I have to confirm was accurate; this card is worth reviewing as a warning not to use it and to explain how bad it truly is.  To begin with, if you want to “make” your opponent draw three cards as part of a mill strategy… too bad!  They can always choose to guess wrong.  If you want to draw three cards… why would you play this card instead of Cheren and/or Tierno?  Either of those Supporters guarantees you draw three cards, no questions asked.  If you have no Pokémon in hand to play down that has its height printed on it, you can’t play Cedric Juniper.  If you only have something that is already visible in play… you can play it but you’ll get the result you didn’t want.

 

This is not a wholly new card.  The name is new, and the exact stats and effect are as well, but very similar cards have existed since the Gym expansions.  Blaine’s Quiz #1 had the same scenario but was a “regular” Trainer because Supporters hadn’t been invented yet, and the player that drew cards got to draw only two instead of three.  Blaine’s Quiz #2 and Blaine’s Quiz #3 were similar guessing games.  Pokémon Personality Test also featured a similar mechanic; guessing whether an Evolution you selected from your hand had either “Light”, “Dark”, or neither one in its name with the same rewards as for Cedric Juniper.  The big difference is that again, it was a “regular” Trainer, an Item before they were called Items.

 

This would be a risky but interesting mechanic on an Item, and a potential incentive for playing lesser played Pokémon, but as a Supporter it needs rewards that you can’t get just by playing a different, no fail Supporter.  I still would take issue with it, though… because this is just a bad mechanic.  The way this card works is that if your opponent is prepared to memorize the heights of all Pokémon (a huge waste of time – seriously), they get a reward.  If they aren’t wasting their lives to such a degree, you might get to draw some cards.  If they really want to use the quiz mechanic, lets restrict it to something a bit more reasonable; the cards in the deck of the player asking the question.  While it would be tricky to do that without allowing your opponent to handle your cards, knowing the heights of the Pokémon in your own deck isn’t a ridiculous thing… and either way, the card shouldn’t be all or nothing.

 

Don’t use this in Modified or Unlimited.  Do use it in Limited, where the card is at its best; decks are likely to be using some fairly “random” seeming Pokémon, even though it has to be something from the set, it is unlikely your opponent will know it (or that a copy said opponent can just look at will be in play).  Plus this is a format where you are pretty desperate for draw power.  Just remember that you have next to no reason to force it into a “+39” build where you have a single Basic Pokémon; you would have to include filler Evolutions in order to allow the card a chance to work!

 

Ratings

 

Unlimited: 1/5

 

Modified: 1/5

 

Limited: 4.8/5

 

Summary

An old, gimmicky mechanic returns and it shouldn’t have; Cedric Juniper rewards your opponent for you wasting slots in your deck and said opponent wasting his or her life.  I also keep nearly calling it “Cedric Diggory” because of the “Harry Potter” character.


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