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Pojo's Magic The Gathering
Card of the Day

Daily Since November 2001!

Sorin, Lord of Innistrad
Image from Wizards.com

Sorin, Lord of Innistrad
Dark Ascension

Reviewed February 7, 2012

Constructed: 4.40
Casual: 4.50
Limited: 4.75
Multiplayer: 4.35

Ratings are based on a 1 to 5 scale
1 being the worst.  3 ... average.  
5 is the highest rating

Click here to see all of our 
Card of the Day Reviews 

BMoor

Sorin, Lord of Innistrad

This is a powerful planeswalker. At four mana, Sorin 2.0 is perfectly positioned on the planeswalker's curve-- more expensive 'walkers never catch on, and cheaper ones never seem to be powerful enough. But this one has all the earmarks of a winner. His +1 ability makes a 1/1 token, an ability good 'walkers have employed before, and his tokens have lifelink to extend your survivability and improve their abilities as blockers, to say nothing of their Vampire tribal connections. His second ability makes emblems, which means using it once gives you a game-long benefit even if your opponent destroys Sorin and all of your creatures. And because Sorin 2.0 is the first card to make an emblem so cheaply, it's easy to imagine a scenario in which you've managed to make twp or three emblems, giving every creature that comes down afterwards +3/+0. At that point, every token Sorin makes is on its own a dangerous threat, to say nothing of any creature you cast. Compared to that, the Ultimate ability is almost a letdown, but being able to permanently steal up to three creatures or planeswalkers? That's a 6-for-1 in terms of card advantage, and will undeniably turn any game far in your advantage.

Constructed- 4
Casual- 4.5
Limited- 4.9
Multiplayer- 4.75


David Fanany

Player since 1995

Sorin, Lord of Innistrad

This is it. The big guy, the man himself, the character who Innistrad's entire history revolves around, and possibly the most talked-about card in Dark Ascension. The next Mind Sculptor and/or a possible flop, depending on who you ask. I frankly see no need to be negative about Sorin's second incarnation. Even assessing him by the standards of recent planeswalker cards, he holds up well: he makes creatures who can defend him or attack, and boosts your strategic position, reminiscent of Elspeth or Garruk but in a color combination that opens a variety of interesting strategic possibilities. He tempts you towards playing a black/white midrange token-using deck in almost any format he's legal in; best of all, he does so without being the dominating, universal overshadower that the Mind Sculptor was. "Example of great design" is not a phrase we're used to hearing in connection with Sorin, but perhaps we should get used to it.

Constructed: 4/5
Casual: 4/5
Limited: 5/5
Multiplayer: 4/5


Paul

Welcome back readers Sorin Lord of Innistrad is an exceptional tool for black and white token decks, serving a similar role to Ajani n in early black/white token strategies Sorin can creature tokens and then in turn pump all your tokens with an emblem. In standard this will see competitive play combined with the plethora of powerful token generators and humans from Innistrad and if all else fails this could be slotted into current decks but In standard I see it making more of a splash as a competitive card in tokens. In extended and modern the same style applies except token decks have a wider variety of cards to work with a higher power level and I see this card seeing play in this format as well. In legacy and vintage it could see a small amount of play but overall it doesn’t add much to decks it could fit into and its unlikely new decks would be made in these formats around it, a solid card and a potential player however. In casual and multiplayer I raved and chose this as my favorite multiplayer card of the new set, creating tokens and being able to pump them is powerful and the ultimate is insane in casual and multiplayer games. In limited this is a bomb and I would first pick it almost every time and build around it or find a way to splash it, it is that powerful. Overall a card with a plethora of casual and competitive uses and will see play everywhere.

Constructed: 4.0
Casual: 4.0
Limited: 4.5
Multiplayer: 4.0

Michael "Maikeruu" Pierno

Today's card of the day is Sorin, Lord of Innistrad is a four mana Black and White planeswalker with three loyalty and three very interesting abilities. The first makes 1/1 Black vampire tokens with Lifelink which are an excellent offensive or defensive card, particularly with the large number of support options available. The option of makin +1/+0 emblems is nice, though unlikely to be used often outside of an existing token swarm that can win the game in a turn or two. The ultimate being able to steal three targeted planeswalkers or creatures is a huge advantage and the +1 feeds into it nicely as defense or a final attack against a weakened enemy. The biggest issue with this Sorin is the opposing colors, so few decks outside of Black/White tokens are likely to take advantage of it, yet in that build this is an excellent addition.

For Limited blending White and Black can be problematic, but the first and last effects of Sorin make the effort worthwhile. Token generation is nearly always a huge advantage in the format and having Lifelink on them is a big issue for any opponent. The ultimate should win most games if it is played and given the lack of removal and production of tokens for defense it is very likely to trigger. Even subtracting the current price tag of the card he should always be picked first when opening a pack and never passed to use in your own build or to keep the threat contained. In Sealed forcing both colors or one as a splash should be seriously considered as few cards can match the impact Sorin will usually have on a game.

Constructed: 4.5
Casual: 4.5
Limited: 4.5
Multiplayer: 4.5

John
Shultis
Phoenix
Gaming

Welcome to the card of the day section here at Pojo.com! Sorry you missed us yesterday, but we are back today with a two-for Tuesday! And what a two they are! Kicking things off is Sorin, Lord of Innistrad. This revamped Sorin costs two generic, a white and a black mana. Sorin enters play with three loyalty counters. His first ability is a plus one, and it puts a 1/1 black Vampire creature token with lifelink onto the battlefield. His second ability is a minus 2, and gives you an emblem saying creatures you control get +1/+0. His final ability is a minus six, you destroy up to three target creatures and/or planes walkers. Return each card put into a graveyard this way onto the battlefield under your control.

Sorin, Lord of Innistrad is awesome. Hands down, such a great card. The fact that he can produce multiple emblems, which is a stacking thing, meaning activate that ability three times, you have three emblems, and your creatures are getting +3/+0. Then, he is able to produce an army in which to defend himself, and they have lifelink. But his final is where it is truly epicness. Destroying three creatures and/or planeswalkers, then gaining control of them yourself. I mean whether it is one big creature, a useful creature, and then a planeswalker, or three planeswalkers, or even three creatures, the creature advantage gained is tremendous!

Comboing his first ability is also very easy. Building a deck with green in it with Sorin could limit needing all three colors, so you could well add Sorin to a two colored deck of choice, either black or white with the green, and then take full advantage of his abilities with cards like Parallel Lives and Doubling Season. Dropping Sorin while Doubling Season is out means you can fire off the final ability when he resolves (providing that no one takes him out or lowers his loyalty first). That means that your four mana could gain you three creature, three planeswalkers, or some combination therein. With either Parallel Lives or Doubling Season out, when Sorin produces one token, it doubles. Which is also incremental. Meaning that if you can get more Parallel Lives out or a Parallel Lives and Doubling Season, the tokens double again!

Then there is the second ability. When combined into the fact you are running very mean deck colors in white and black, there are reasons why that emblem is so nice. An army of pumped vampires, and many have lifelink, or an army of first striking soldiers, now getting even bigger.

These things combine to truly make Sorin the Lord of Innistrad!

Limited: 5/5
Casual: 5/5
Constructed: 5/5
Multiplayer: 4/5


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